Launching E. Lynn Harris’ posthumous book tour

A collection of authors, friends and family of author E. Lynn Harris joined together Tuesday to launch the national tour for "Mama Dearest," the 12th—and final—novel from the gay Atlanta author.    READ MORE »

Taking stock of author Joseph Olshan

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More after the jump.    READ MORE »

Gay men of mystery stop at Outwrite

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M.W. Moore introduces final piece in trilogy

imageAuthor M.W. Moore knows his way around Outwrite Bookstore & Coffeehouse. The Houston native enjoyed his third time in the gayborhood venue on Friday, this time to read from and discuss his latest work "An About Face."

The work is the final installment in a semi-fictional trilogy that explores Moore's turbulent life that goes from a promising collegiate athletic career to vices and a stint in prison. Moore attended colleges in Texas and Mississippi where he studied industrial technology and completed in the 200- and 400-meter runs. He continues to participate in track events in Houston, where he works as a rig solution specialist in the oil and gas industry when he's not creating steamy scenes for his upcoming novels.

Moore spent a little time with Outwrite owner Philip Rafshoon (photo) and his staff before reading from "An About Face."    READ MORE »

South Florida travel guide gets ATL exposure

imageTravel writer Paul Rubio was more than happy to mug a little for the camera while in Atlanta Wednesday pitching his new book.

Rubio, a recovering economist and environmental policy analyst, hit Outwrite Bookstore & Coffehouse to host the local launch party for "Out Traveler: South Florida." It was the last stop on a publicity tour for the new work, which explores South Florida's spicy gay culture.

The guide is from the same series published by Alyson Books that includes "Out Traveler: Atlanta," from local boys Matt Burkhalter and Jordan McAuley. They debuted their version during a similar event in February.    READ MORE »

‘Unfriendly Fire’ douses military ban on gays

imageNathaniel Frank brought his national book tour to Atlanta on Thursday, talking up and signing his work that deconstructs the process and reasoning behind the military's ban on openly gay service members.

Frank, a professor and researcher, wrote “Unfriendly Fire: How the Gay Ban Undermines America and Weakens the Military," which makes a clear case against "Don't Ask, Don't Tell." The policy has come under renewed attention since the Obama administration has pledged to overturn it.

The author answered questions from an audience at Outwrite Bookstore & Coffeehouse that included several gay and lesbian veterans.

More, including photos, after the jump.    READ MORE »

Nathaniel Frank talks gays in military tonight

imageWith a new president has come renewed attention on "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," the military's ban on openly gay service members. Nathaniel Frank's timing couldn't have been better.

Frank, a professor, put his academic prowess to work in crafting "Unfriendly Fire: How the Gay Ban Undermines America and Weakens the Military,” which recently landed on shelves. He appears at
Outwrite Bookstore & Coffeehouse tonight at 8 pm. to discuss the book and the policy he says is framed around "lies and deception."

More, including video, after the jump.    READ MORE »

Atlantan among Lambda Literary nominees

imageTransgender writer and Atlanta resident Scott Turner Schofield is among the 105 finalists competing for a Lambda Literary Award.

The nominees, which span 22 categories and represent 72 publishers, were announced today by the Lambda Literary Foundation. The Los Angeles-based group for gay writers and readers will announce the winners May 28.

Schofield is among the nominees in two categories -- transgender and LGBT Drama -- for "Two Truths and a Lie" from Homofactus Press. Schofield describes the book as "a memoir passing as three solo plays" on his web site.

More, including the full list of nominees, after the jump.    READ MORE »

An inside look at traveling out in Atlanta

imageAdd a little swag, a new book and some alcohol and you've got a launch party.

That's exactly what Matt Burkhalter and Jordan McAuley had in mind on Wednesday for the debut of "Out Traveler: Atlanta," their new guide to gay Atlanta. It's the second rendition of the guide from the local authors, who first published "ATLANTAboy: An Insider's Guide to Gay Atlanta" in 2005.

More, including photos, after the jump.    READ MORE »

‘ATLANTAboy’ guide to gay Atlanta gets makeover

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Perhaps no one was more surprised by the far-reaching success of the 2005 book “ATLANTAboy: An Insider’s Guide to Gay Atlanta” than the authors themselves.

Jordan McAuley and Matt Burkhalter, best friends since middle school in Buckhead, compiled the book after noticing travel books on other cities, but none on Atlanta.

“I thought it was a good idea, but I was blown away by the response,” Burkhalter says. “Straight people were telling us, ‘anyone would be interested in this stuff,’ and even people from Atlanta were learning things about local gay history that they didn’t know.”

After self-publishing and selling out the book, the guys toyed with multiple requests to update “ATLANTAboy” for a second edition. That’s when Alyson Books and its parent Regent Media — part of the corporate giant responsible for Here!TV as well as Out and Advocate magazines — stepped in with a proposal to make Atlanta the fourth in its “Out Traveler” series, which also features editions on New York City, Hawaii and South Florida.

More than just listings a la the “Damron” or “Sparticus” guides, the powers at Regent “really want to give a taste and tone of the city itself,” McAuley says.    READ MORE »

Insider’s guide to gay Atlanta gets makeover

imagePerhaps no one was more surprised by the far-reaching success of the 2005 book “ATLANTAboy: An Insider’s Guide to Gay Atlanta” than the authors themselves.

Jordan McAuley and Matt Burkhalter, best friends since middle school in Buckhead, compiled the book after noticing travel books on other cities, but none on Atlanta.

“I thought it was a good idea, but I was blown away by the response,” Burkhalter says. “Straight people were telling us, ‘anyone would be interested in this stuff,’ and even people from Atlanta were learning things about local gay history that they didn’t know.”

More after the jump.    READ MORE »

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