Conservative religious activists, fearful that they will face discrimination in a state controlled by religious conservatives, want to resurrect a controversial 'religious freedom' bill. The push has set off alarm bells from LGBT activists.

Georgia Equality has twice warned its supporters that Senate Bill 377 could resurface on Thursday as lawmakers, faced with the last day of the Gold Dome session, may pull some procedural shenanigans to have the bill surface.

Lawmakers were pressured by supporters of the bill on Wednesday, led in part by Julianne Thompson (photo) of the Capitol Coalition of Conservatives. She's one of at least a trio of conservatives who's been ranting since the measures were shelved.

She kept it up on Wednesday, according to CBS Atlanta.

When asked if the proposals would open the possibility of discrimination, coalition co-founder Julianne Thompson said "it hasn't nationally and it's the federal law."

Thompson said religious freedoms are under attack.

When asked why constitutional protections were not adequate, Thompson responded "the constitution also protects Second Amendment rights and we feel it is important to protect the First Amendment rights as well."

Georgia Equality responded with a warning to supporters.

Because of your hard work and willingness to take action, we have been successful in preventing any of the religious discrimination bills from receiving a vote in either the Senate or the House.

While this is very good news, there is still one day left for the legislature to take action and there are bills that may be amended at the last minute to include the language from these bills.

We are asking all of our supporters to be prepared to act quickly if you receive a notice from us via email or Facebook that this has happened.  The last day typically isn't adjourned until late into the night so please stay with us as long as you can.

And urged them to take action on Thursday morning.

Apparently, it's time to rally the same LGBT activists who helped shut down the bills in late February.

UPDATE | The sponsor of Senate Bill 377, Sen. Josh McKoon, says it's dead. Again.

But there may be one more bill to keep watch on.