image Ten teams from the Hotlanta Softball League competed in the Gay Softball World Series, which wrapped up Saturday on Day 5 in Seattle. Art Davenport (photo), HSL’s Open Division secretary, has been blogging here throughout the Series.

Read his previous posts here, here, here, here, here and here. View the Outsports photo gallery from the series here.

My apologies for the delay in this final posting. Saturday was a long and busy day, then Sunday I had to get everything together for the flight home. But then, you’re really not reading this for those bits of info, but how Atlanta teams did on the final day in the series.

On Saturday at 8 a.m., the Steel (D) started their game against the Houston Vipers and won the game in a run-rule situation, but not before the Vipers filed a protest against the Steel. The winner of this game was to move on and play the Muddawgs and it looked like it was another ATL vs. ATL match-up, but the new game was delayed while the protest procedure was followed.

The sad news is that another two players were re-rated higher and ejected from the game. As the Steel had accrued three additional points during the protest process, that disqualified them and the team was ejected from the GSWS. So the Vipers moved up to play the Muddawgs.

The Vipers won the game, but this time it was the Muddawgs who filed the protest and won it. So the Vipers were eliminated from the tournament and the Muddawgs moved up to the final championship game against the Seattle Atomics. The Muddawgs played a hard game, but the Atomics played a little bit harder and won the game the series. But for the Muddawgs first appearance at the GSWS, second place is great.

Now, a word about protests and ratings. The North American Gay Amateur Athletic Association (NAGAAA), the sanctioning body for gay men’s softball, has a ratings system with 27 questions (points) and each division has certain guidelines. For example, no player in the D Division can be rated above a 10 and the combined score for the top 10 players cannot exceed 100. In C, no player can be above a 14 and their combined top 10 cannot be over 130.

If, during a game, one team feels the other is under-rated, they can file a protest, which has some paperwork to complete and fees to pay. Once the game is over, the two teams report to an assigned protest committee to review the information and hear evidence. If a player exceeds his division’s cap, he is declared an ineligible player. If a team exceeds their “top 10” rating, or if they accrue more than three points, during the protest process, they are ineligible.

Now, protests can be seen as sour grapes because it’s generally the losing team who files one. But it’s more about creating and maintaining a level playing field.

More to follow.

Open Division A
First: Los Angeles Vipers
Second: Atlanta Mudcats
Third: Phoenix Toros
Fourth: Atlanta Venom and Houston Force

Open Division B
First: Boston Club Cafe Crew
Second: Long Beach Roughriders
Third: Chicago SPIN Cougars
Fourth: Boston Angels

Open Division C
First: Dallas Xplosion
Second: Philadelphia Triple Play
Third: Twin Cities Edge
Fourth: Twin Cities Mess

Open Division D
First: Seattle Atomic
Second: Atlanta Muddawgs
Third: Boston Ramrod Machine
Fourth: Chicago Chargers

Results from the Women’s Division are not available.