imageDang that kooky artist, bartender and local gadabout Grant Henry, aka Sister Louisa (top photo). He never ceases to surprise us, and his irreverent new monthly art gathering is no exception.

When we call Henry a local gadabout, we could also call him a “Local” phenom. He holds court at The Local lounge in a one-man event that draws friends and new admirers. Leave it to Grant Henry to make Monday bar nights a happening.

Henry started making his move from underground guru to the mainstream consciousness when his real-life adventures started making print in the Creative Loafing weekly column by his good friend, writer Hollis Gillespie. His appearances as “gay Grant” in Gillespie’s musings extended later into her hilarious books about life in the ATL.

As his artist alter ego Sister Louisa, Henry’s works (middle photos) often twist religious icons and folk art in a mixed-media bonanza that boasts quite a fan-base.

imageHe also made a city-wide splash a few years ago when he sold off his extensive collection of original mid-century art, accessories and furniture by snagging a feature about it in the AJC.

Henry makes lots of splashes, actually. People follow him on Facebook just to see what he says next. He’s simply that kind of guy. In short, drawing attention to himself comes naturally for Henry, and we love him for it.

Starting Sunday, the mind that’s always spinning in unexpected directions now brings us the first of his monthly Sunday Art Services, an informal gathering at what the host calls “The Church of the Living Room and Ping Pong Emporium”—otherwise known as his expansive place in the Telephone Factory Lofts.

imageDon’t even bother asking “Why didn’t I think of that?” You couldn’t have. That’s OK.

In all the tongue-in-cheek goodness of the host himself, this month’s installment features a laid-back Sunday vibe and original artwork by Arge. The fun, deviant little works (bottom images) bring to mind Hanna-Barbera if they were on acid with a socio-political chip on their shoulders. The artist (Jon Arge) considers “color and imagery like a weapon, and art a contact sport.” He calls Sunday Art Services “two great tastes that taste great together.”

That’s enough for us to recommend it for a Sunday Service you wouldn’t bring Granny to, and sure as hell wouldn’t want to. Leave her where she belongs, and join the fray.

All images copyright the artists.